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Crop Pollination Exposes Honey Bees to Pesticides Which Alters Their Susceptibility to the Gut Pathogen Nosema ceranae by Jeffery S. Pettis, Elinor M. Lichtenberg, Michael Andree, Jennie Stitzinger, Robyn Rose, Dennis van Engelsdorp . Published: July 24, 2013DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070182

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0070182#authcontrib

Recent declines in honey bee populations and increasing demand for insect-pollinated crops raise concerns about pollinator shortages. Pesticide exposure and pathogens may interact to have strong negative effects on managed honey bee colonies. Such findings are of great concern given the large numbers and high levels of pesticides found in honey bee colonies. Thus it is crucial to determine how field-relevant combinations and loads of pesticides affect bee health. Continue Reading »

Scientists are extremely concerned about the hazards of GMOs to biodiversity, food safety, human and animal health, and demand a moratorium on environmental releases in accordance with the precautionary principle.
They are opposed to GM crops that will intensify corporate monopoly, exacerbate inequality and prevent the essential shift to sustainable agriculture that can provide food security and health around the world.
They call for a ban on patents of life-forms and living processes which threaten food security, sanction biopiracy of indigenous knowledge and genetic resources and violate basic human rights and dignity.
They want more support on research and development of non-corporate, sustainable agriculture that can benefit family farmers all over the world. Continue Reading »

Department of Health Flyer on Pesticides and Your Health
Read, Print and Share. Education is the key!

http://www.sarasotahealth.org/Documents/Env/pesticides_and_your_health.pdf

The Lancet Neurology, Volume 13, Issue 3, Pages 330 – 338, March 2014 <Previous Article
doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(13)70278-3Cite or Link Using DOI
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.
Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

Dr Philippe Grandjean and Philip J Landrigan

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur/article/PIIS1474-4422(13)70278-3/abstract

Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental neurotoxicants—manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new international clearinghouse.

Fungicides Linked to Resistance in Life-Threatening Fungus
by Margaret Munro

http://www.cornucopia.org/2014/07/fungicides-linked-resistance-life-threatening-fungus

Amid growing concern that fungicides are fuelling the rise of resistant and life-threatening fungus in Europe, China and India, a microbial sleuth says it is time to start filling in the gaps in Canada. Continue Reading »

THE SECOND SILENT SPRING: Pesticides don’t just kill pests. New research out of the Netherlands provides compelling evidence linking a widely used class of insecticides to population declines across 14 species of birds. Those insecticides, called neonicotinoids, have been in the news lately due to the way they hurt bees and other pollinators. This new paper, published in Nature, gets at another angle of the story – the way these chemicals can indirectly affect other creatures in the ecosystem. There are many studies that show that neonics harm bees. “I think we are the first to show that this insecticide may have wide-scale, significant effects on our environment,” said Hans de Kroon, an expert on population dynamics at Radboud University and one of the authors of the paper.
READ MORE: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140709-birds-insects-pesticides-insecticides-neonicotinoids-silent-spring/
Direct link to the study: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13531.html#ref-link-43

Parkinson’s Disease and Pesticides – what’s the connection?
The pesticide Parkinson’s connection. What exactly causes Parkinson’s disease is far from figured out. But a clue has been lurking in cornfields for years. The data confirm it: farmers are more prone to Parkinson’s than the general population. And pesticides could be to blame. Over a decade of evidence shows a clear association between pesticide exposure and a higher risk for the second most common neurodegenerative disease, after Alzheimer’s. A new study published in Neurology proposes a potential mechanism by which at least some pesticides might contribute to Parkinson’s. Continue Reading »

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