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Archive for October, 2013

Abstract – The potential etiologic role of household pesticide exposures was examined in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. The use of professional pest control services at any time from 1 year before birth to 3 years after was associated with a significantly increased risk of childhood leukemia.The findings suggest that exposure to household pesticides is associated with an elevated risk of childhood leukemia and further indicate the importance of the timing and location of exposure.
Environ Health Perspect. 2002 September; 110(9): 955–960. PMCID: PMC1240997
Research Article Critical windows of exposure to household pesticides and risk of childhood leukemia.

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Abstract – We previously described how retail meat, particularly chicken, might be a reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. To rule out retail beef and pork as potential reservoirs, we tested 320 additional E. coliisolates from these meats. Isolates from beef and pork were significantly less likely than those from chicken to be genetically related to isolates from humans with UTIs. We then tested whether the reservoir for ExPEC in humans could be food animals themselves by comparing geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from 475 humans with UTIs and from cecal contents of 349 slaughtered animals. We found genetic similarities between E. coli from animals in abattoirs, principally chickens, and ExPEC causing UTIs in humans. ExPEC transmission from food animals could be responsible for human infections, and chickens are the most probable reservoir. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/18/3/11-1099_article.htm

Catherine Racicot Bergeron1, Catharine Prussing1, Patrick Boerlin, Danielle Daignault, Lucie Dutil2, Richard J. Reid-Smith, George G. Zhanel, and Amee R. MangesComments to Author  Author affiliations: McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada (C. Racicot Bergeron, C. Prussing, A.R. Manges); University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (P. Boerlin, R.J. Reid-Smith); Public Health Agency of Canada, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada (D. Daignault, L. Dutil); Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph (R.J. Reid-Smith); University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (G.G. Zhanel)  (more…)

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http://earthopensource.org/files/pdfs/Roundup-and-birth-defects/Antoniou-Teratogenic-Effects-of-Glyphosate-Based-Herbicides.pdf

 

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The pesticide industry and EU regulators knew as long ago as the 1980s-1990s that Roundup, the world’s best selling herbicide, causes birth defects – but they failed to inform the public.Roundup and Birth Defects: Is the Public Being Kept in the Dark? Teratogenic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides: Divergence of regulatory decisions from scientific evidence“.
This report, co-authored by international scientists and researchers, reveals that industry’s own studies (including one commissioned by Monsanto) showed as long ago as the 1980s that Roundup’s active ingredient glyphosate causes birth defects in laboratory animals. (more…)

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Chemical Exposures: Prostate Cancer and Early BPA Exposure

Julian Josephson Environ Health Perspect. 2006 September; 114(9): A520.
 Copyright This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose
 In animal models, estrogens can drive carcinogenesis of the prostate and have long been suspected of playing a role in human prostate cancer. Scientists have hypothesized that prenatal exposure to estrogen-like compounds, including monomeric bisphenol A (BPA), may account for recent increases in rates of prostate cancer. Now a rat study by Gail Prins of the University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Urology, Shuk-Mei Ho of the University of Cincinnati Department of Environmental Health, and their colleagues provides the first evidence of a direct link between low-dose BPA exposure during development and later prostate cancer.

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