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Archive for the ‘GMO’s’ Category

Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent. An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process  http://www.nature.com/articles/srep37855

In conclusion, our integrative statistical and bioinformatics analysis allowed us to suggest a mechanistic link between the proteome and metabolome alterations observed and the insertion of a particular transgene. The transformation process and the resulting expression of a transgenic protein cause a general disturbance in the GM plant and it is clear that NK603 maize is markedly different from its non-GM isogenic line at the proteome and metabolome levels. In addition, our data correlates with previous studies, which observed higher amounts of ROS that act as free-radicals promoting oxidative stress in those transgenic plant materials. We also confirm a metabolic imbalance in energy and carbohydrate metabolism.

Robin Mesnage, Sarah Z. Agapito-Tenfen, Vinicius Vilperte, George Renney, Malcolm Ward, Gilles-Eric Séralini, Rubens O. Nodari & Michael N. Antoniou Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 37855 (2016)

Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as ‘substantially equivalent’ to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism. Changes in proteins and metabolites of glutathione metabolism were indicative of increased oxidative stress. The most pronounced metabolome differences between NK603 and its isogenic counterpart consisted of an increase in polyamines including N-acetyl-cadaverine (2.9-fold), N-acetylputrescine (1.8-fold), putrescine (2.7-fold) and cadaverine (28-fold), which depending on context can be either protective or a cause of toxicity. Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent. (more…)

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Once again, residues of the herbicide glyphosate have been found in commonly consumed foods. A new report produced by Food Democracy Now and the Detox Project found “extremely high levels” of glyphosate residues in popular foods, from Cheerios and Ritz Crackers to Kashi cookies. According to the report, glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto‘s Roundup, “is the most heavily used chemical weedkiller in food and agricultural production in human history.” http://inhabitat.com/glyphosate-found-in-cheerios-kashi-cookies-and-other-popular-food-items/                         by Lacy Cooke  of inhabitat

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At Community Day School in Sarasota, Florida the Precautionary Principle was adopted by the schools board of directors. As a result no chemical pesticides are used in the school’s Papa Ed and Mimi Sustainable Garden or on the campus. Advocating the Precautionary Principle means to hold the pesticide accountable and  no pesticide or any chemical can be used around children unless the pesticide is PROVEN safe first not relatively safe but completely harmless.

The Precautionary Principle and the Community Day School adopting of APP flies in the face of the chemical pesticide industry which is protected by the pseudo science of ” relative toxicity” in which chemical pesticides are registered for use by and on its” relative safety.” This is pseudo science since the pesticides relative safety is determined by regulatory on its LD 50.

So what is an LD 50 that determines a pesticides relative safety ? An LD50  is the amount of the pesticide (the Lethal Dose) that kills 50% of the lab animals tested. Therefore according to the tenets of relative toxicity (or safety) the pesticide with the lowest amount of chemical that kills the 50 % of lab animals ( LD50 Lethal Dose) the relative toxicity is greater than a chemical which kills the 50% of lab animals with a lesser amount.Therefore the chemical which uses a greater amount that kills the same 50% of lab animals is RELATIVE SAFER. What a crock!  Now if you do not pause and consider that bizarre enough remember the testing is only on the 50% killed by the lethal dose, but what about the surviving 50% what conditions did those animals suffer. There is no data no testing no reporting required on the 50% of surviving animals. And that is all we have as a nation to protect our children from damage due to pesticides exposure.

Comments Sarah Catherine Leithauser-French on pesticide registration and the LD 50 registration ” With all the false labelling hiding GMOS in food & drink under natural sounding words. Surely not a funny jokes to the millions with GI issues, allergies, nervous system, neurological & other maladies already. Unconscionable. Opposite of the Golden Rule. Plus arrogantly, and without apology.What about their own children, relatives, grandchildren, or friends? I can’t understand it at all.”

Four in five U.S. children are exposed to organophosphate pesticides, mostly from food. (Though several studies have also linked organophosphate exposure in pregnant women and children to residential insecticide use in urban areas, where indoor pest control is common.) In addition to pesticides, almost all children also carry levels of lead, mercury, the plastics additive bisphenol A, flame retardants, and dozens of other untested chemicals in their bodies. (more…)

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The Slow Poisoning of Health and the Environment by COLIN TODHUNTER

The Slow Poisoning of Health and the Environment

CounterPunch Tells the Facts and Names the Names
Copyright © CounterPunch counterpunch@counterpunch.org

It’s an all too common tale of dirty deeds, shady deals and propaganda. Rosemary Mason’s recent open letter to journalists at The Guardian outlines how the media is failing the public by not properly reporting on the regulatory delinquency relating to GM food and the harmful chemicals being applied to crops. Much of the media is even (unwittingly) acting as a propaganda arm for big agritech companies.

An open ‘Letter from America’ was penned in November 2014 warning countries in Europe and EU regulators not to authorise (chemical-dependent) GM crops because of the devastating effects on human health and the environment. Mason notes that David Cameron ignored that advice. The European Commission and the European Food Safety Authority also ignored it and have continued to allow GM into food and feed in the EU and sanction the ongoing use of dangerous pesticides.

While there is undoubtedly good work being carried out by individual journalists in this area, Mason feels the media should be doing more to hold officials to account and should report more accurately on the consequences of the genetic modification of food as well as the effects of agrochemicals. (more…)

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How Society Subsidizes Big Food and Poor Health

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2530898

Approximately 80% of calories eaten in the United States are grown domestically.1 Yet, the US diet is a leading cause of morbidity. The analysis by Siegel et al2 in this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that through commodity subsidies that encourage poor diet we are, in part, paying for our own demise.

However, commodity subsidies are a small part of a bigger problem. From 2014 to 2023, the 2014 US Farm Bill will cost $956 billion (letter from D. W. Elmendorf to Frank D. Lucas, chair of the House Committee on Agriculture; http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/hr2642LucasLtr.pdf), of which direct support for commodity production is only $44.5 billion over 10 years. Furthermore, among a range of agricultural products, farmers receive the greatest share of the retail price in beef and milk at 50% compared with only 7% for processed food, such as bread. So, while processed food prices may be low, commodity subsidies are not the primary cause.

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Association of Higher Consumption of Foods Derived From Subsidized Commodities With Adverse Cardiometabolic Risk Among US Adults

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2530901

Food subsidies are designed to enhance food availability, but whether they promote cardiometabolic health is unclear. Objective  investigate whether higher consumption of foods derived from subsidized food commodities is associated with adverse cardiometabolic risk among US adults.

Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2001 to 2006. Our final analysis was performed in January 2016. Participants were 10 308 nonpregnant adults 18 to 64 years old in the general community.

Exposure From a single day of 24-hour dietary recall in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we calculated an individual-level subsidy score that estimated an individual’s consumption of subsidized food commodities as a percentage of total caloric intake.

Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcomes were body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), abdominal adiposity, C-reactive protein level, blood pressure, non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and glycemia.

Conclusions and Relevance Among US adults, higher consumption of calories from subsidized food commodities was associated with a greater probability of some cardiometabolic risks. Better alignment of agricultural and nutritional policies may potentially improve population health.

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It’s been said that weeds are just plants whose virtues have not yet been discovered. True plant vegetable gardens and pull up that lawn,
But if you’re tired of waiting to find out what those virtues are, you might want to use one of these homemade herbicides instead of the chemical versions.
Many common weeds can be either food, medicine, or unwanted visitors to the garden, depending on the varieties and how you view them. But if you’ve eaten all of them you can, and you still need to get rid of weeds in your yard, it’s far better for you, your soil, and your local waterways to choose a more environmentally friendly herbicide than those commonly found in the home and garden center.
Strong chemical herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides can end up polluting our drinking water, our groundwater, and surface water, so it’s important to consider the longer term effects of using them, and to instead make the choice to use a gentler herbicide, which won’t contribute to the larger issue of water contamination. (more…)

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