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Archive for the ‘Treatments homeopathic’ Category

Restoration of Function With Acupuncture Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4653595/

This case report illustrates the improvement of an acupuncture-treated patient who incurred a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a snowboarding accident. Over 4 years, the patient progressed from initially not being able to walk, having difficulty with speech, and suffering from poor eyesight to where he has now regained significant motor function, speech, and vision and has returned to snowboarding. A core acupuncture protocol plus specific points added to address the patient’s ongoing concerns was used. This case adds to the medical literature by demonstrating the potential role of acupuncture in TBI treatment.
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New Technique Successfully Dissolves Blood Clots in the Brain and Lowers Risk of Brain Damage After Stroke
CT-guided catheters carry clot-busting drug to shrink clots, Johns Hopkins-led study shows.

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/new_technique_successfully_dissolves_blood_clots_in_the_brain_and_lowers_risk_of_brain_damage_after_stroke

Johns Hopkins neurologists report success with a new means of getting rid of potentially lethal blood clots in the brain safely without cutting through easily damaged brain tissue or removing large pieces of skull. The minimally invasive treatment, they report, increased the number of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) who could function independently by 10 to 15 percent six months following the procedure.

The new study was coordinated by Johns Hopkins and the surgical review centers at the University of Cincinnati and the University of Chicago. All 93 patients were diagnosed with ICH, a particularly lethal or debilitating form of stroke long considered surgically untreatable under most circumstances.

“The last untreatable form of stroke may well have a treatment,” says study leader Daniel F. Hanley, M.D., a professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “If a larger study proves our findings correct, we may substantially reduce the burden of strokes for patients and their families by increasing the number of people who can be independent again after suffering a stroke.”

ICH is a bleed in the brain that causes a clot to form, often caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure. The clot builds up pressure and leaches inflammatory chemicals that can cause irreversible brain damage, often leading to death or extreme disability. The standard of care for ICH patients is general supportive care, usually in an ICU; only 10 percent undergo the more invasive and risky craniotomy surgery, which involves removing a portion of the skull and making incisions through healthy brain tissue to reach and remove the clot. Roughly 50 percent of people who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage die from it. For more information:

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/profiles/results/directory/profile/0001943/daniel-hanley?firstLetter=H

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/neurology_neurosurger

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Cannabinoids and gliomas. Velasco G, Carracedo A, Blázquez C, Lorente M, Aguado T, Haro A, Sánchez C, Galve-Roperh I, Guzmán M. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17952650

Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa L., act in the body by mimicking endogenous substances–the endocannabinoids–that activate specific cell surface receptors. Cannabinoids exert various palliative effects in cancer patients. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit the growth of different types of tumor cells, including glioma cells, in laboratory animals.

They do so by modulating key cell signaling pathways, mostly the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, thereby inducing antitumoral actions such as the apoptotic death of tumor cells and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Of interest, cannabinoids seem to be selective antitumoral compounds, as they kill glioma cells, but not their non-transformed astroglial counterparts.

On the basis of these preclinical findings, a pilot clinical study of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme has been recently run. The good safety profile of THC, together with its possible growth-inhibiting action on tumor cells, justifies the setting up of future trials aimed at evaluating the potential antitumoral activity of cannabinoids.

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Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27918106

Rajan TS, Giacoppo S, Scionti D Diomede F, Grassi G, Pollastro F, Piattelli A, Bramanti P Mazzon E, Trubiani O

In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. “From our results we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.”

This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate towards neuronal precursor cells.

Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate theexpression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation.

Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis and nervous system development were significantly modulated.

From our results we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27918106

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Phenethyl isothiocyanate: a comprehensive review of anti-cancer mechanisms.
Gupta P1, Wright SE2, Kim SH3, Srivastava SK4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25152445
Abstract
The epidemiological evidence suggests a strong inverse relationship between dietary intake of cruciferous vegetables and the incidence of cancer. Among other constituents of cruciferous vegetables, isothiocyanates (ITC) are the main bioactive chemicals present. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is present as gluconasturtiin in many cruciferous vegetables with remarkable anti-cancer effects. PEITC is known to not only prevent the initiation phase of carcinogenesis process but also to inhibit the progression of tumorigenesis. PEITC targets multiple proteins to suppress various cancer-promoting mechanisms such as cell proliferation, progression and metastasis. Pre-clinical evidence suggests that combination of PEITC with conventional anti-cancer agents is also highly effective in improving overall efficacy. Based on accumulating evidence, PEITC appears to be a promising agent for cancer therapy and is already under clinical trials for leukemia and lung cancer. This is the first review which provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of PEITC as a future anti-cancer agent.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Mainstream medicine’s cancer treatments of radiation and chemotherapy are far from a cure. In fact, they make cancer more deadly. But new research shows some common vegetables may be more effective in battling cancer.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/cabbage-beats-chemo-cervical-cancer-2?page=1

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/cabbage-beats-chemo-cervical-cancer-2

By: Margie King, Health Coach copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2015

Now researchers from South Dakota State University have found that a compound in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower may target those cancer stem cells. [ii] In fact, it may help prevent the recurrence and spread of some cancers.

The compound is called phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). When the researchers added PEITC to a Petri dish with human cervical cancer stem cells about 75 percent of the stem cells died within 24 hours.

PEITC is found in cruciferous vegetables. Studies show it has anti-inflammatory powers. It’s also been shown to have chemopreventive activity against a range of cancers including colon, prostate, breast, cervical, ovarian, and pancreatic. It’s currently in clinical trials for lung cancer.

The South Dakota researchers found that PEITC slowed the formation of cervical cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. The researchers also found that PEITC significantly reduced the proliferation of both cervical cancer cells and stem cells. In fact, it worked comparably to salinomycin, a chemo drug, but without the toxic side effects.

Why? The answer has to do with cancer stem cells (CSCs) that chemo and radiation can’t touch. (more…)

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Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells. These results show the cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of Tu183 cellular respiration and are toxic to this highly malignant tumor  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20516734

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