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Widespread Contamination Present in the Common Food-Grade Ingredient

A just-issued report by The Cornucopia Institute summarizes research on the common food additive carrageenan, exposing the industry’s hidden data demonstrating that all food-grade carrageenan contains a carcinogenic contaminant—low molecular weight poligeenan.

Carrageenan, harvested from specific species of red seaweed, is a highly effective thickener/stabilizer found in processed foods including infant formula, plant-based beverages, deli meats, and some dairy products, including cream. The controversy over carrageenan has existed between food industry representatives and public health researchers for years, but it is now flaring up again over its use in organic food.

Cornucopia’s report, Carrageenan: New Studies Reinforce Link to Inflammation, Cancer, and Diabetes, will be formally released in Washington, on April 25, at the upcoming meeting of the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board. The board will be debating whether to remove carrageenan from its list of approved materials for use in organic food.

Report Exposes Food Industry Cover-up

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Aldehyde dehydrogenase variation enhances effect of pesticides associated with Parkinson disease

All of the metal-coordinating dithiocarbamates tested (e.g., maneb, ziram), imidazoles (benomyl, triflumizole), dicarboxymides (captan, folpet), and  organochlorine (dieldrin) inhibited ALDH activity, potentially via metabolic byproducts (e.g., carbon disulfide, thiophosgene).

Fifteen screened pesticides did not inhibit ALDH. Exposures to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides were associated with 2- to 6-fold increases in PD risk; genetic variation in ALDH2 exacerbated PD risk in subjects exposed to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides.

Conclusion: ALDH inhibition appears to be an important mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis, especially in genetically vulnerable individuals, suggesting several potential interventions to reduce PD occurrence or slow or reverse its progression.

ldehyde dehydrogenase variation enhances effect of pesticides associated with Parkinson disease Arthur G. Fitzmaurice, Shannon L. Rhodes, Myles Cockburn, Beate Ritz, and Jeff M. Bronstein

http://www.neurology.org/content/82/5/419.short

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With the epidemic of disease continuously wrought on to children in 2016 with a root cause of exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment it is time to remind ourselves of the importance of the research publication called the Presidents Cancer Panel Study 2010. This research is so critical for the health of our children and grandchildren. The research examines the impact of environmental factors on cancer and is subtitled “Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk, what we can do now.”

We must practice the Precautionary Principle when using chemical pesticides and children are present or will be playing in the area.

Click below to read the Presidents Cancer Panel Study 2010 ,which examines the impact of environmental factors on cancer and is subtitled “Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk, what we can do now.”

We need a regulatory approach to children’s health eliminating potential hazards without accepting a level of harm. Chemical companies must prove that their products will have no adverse effect on children’s health before the chemical is approved for use by EPA.

President’s Cancer Panel (PCP) -REDUCING ENVIRONMENTAL CANCER RISK What We Can Do Now THIS IS PEER REVIEWED PUBLISHED SCIENCE WHICH LINKS CHEMICAL EXPOSURE AND CHILDHOOD DISEASE AND IS ADDRESSED IN THE PUBLICATION OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES CANCER PANEL STUDY (PCP)

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE REPORT- REDUCING ENVIRONMENTAL CANCER RISK – WHAT WE CAN DO NOW

http://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/advisory/pcp/annualReports/pcp08-09rpt/PCP_Report_08-09_508.pdf

WHEN YOU READ THE VOLUME OF RESEARCH YOURSELF, YOU WILL UNDERSTAND WHY THE SCIENTISTS STATE IN THE PCP ”GRIEVOUS HARM” TO CHILDREN FROM EXPOSURE HAS NOT BEEN ADDRESSED BY APPROPRIATE ACTION
PLEASE STOP THE USE OF PESTICIDES HERBICIDES OR FUNGISCIDES WHERE AND WHEN CHILDREN ARE PRESENT. THE SCIENCE IS INCONTROVERTIBLE . DEMAND THE USE OF NON TOXIC ALTERNATIVES

A class of commonly used fungicides has been found that produce gene expression changes similar to those in people with autism and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Could new class of fungicides play a role in autism, neurodegenerative diseases? The answer is possibly : Chemicals in this group included the pesticides rotenone, pyridaben, and fenpyroximate, and a new class of fungicides that includes pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, fenamidone, and famoxadone. Azoxystrobin, fluoxastrobin, and kresoxim-methyl are also in this fungicide class.

http://news.unchealthcare.org/news/2016/march/could-a-new-class-of-fungicides-play-a-role-in-autism-neurodegenerative-diseases

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have found a class of commonly used fungicides that produce gene expression changes similar to those in people with autism and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease.The study, published today in the journal Nature Communications, describes a new way to home in on chemicals that have the potential to affect brain functions.

Mark Zylka, PhD, senior author of the study and associate professor of cell biology and physiology at UNC, and his team exposed mouse neurons to approximately 300 different chemicals. Then the researchers sequenced RNA from these neurons to find out which genes were misregulated when compared to untreated neurons. This work created hundreds of data sets of gene expression; genes give rise to products, including proteins or RNA.

Zylka’s team then used computer programs to deduce which chemicals caused gene expression changes that were similar to each other.

“Based on RNA sequencing, we describe six groups of chemicals,” Zylka said. “We found that chemicals within each group altered expression in a common manner. One of these groups of chemicals altered the levels of many of the same genes that are altered in the brains of people with autism or Alzheimer’s disease.”

Chemicals in this group included the pesticides rotenone, pyridaben, and fenpyroximate, and a new class of fungicides that includes pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, fenamidone, and famoxadone. Azoxystrobin, fluoxastrobin, and kresoxim-methyl are also in this fungicide class.

“We cannot say that these chemicals cause these conditions in people,” Zylka cautioned. “Many additional studies will be needed to determine if any of these chemicals represent real risks to the human brain.”

Zylka, a member of the UNC Neuroscience Center, and his group found that these chemicals reduced the expression of genes involved in synaptic transmission – the connections important for communication between neurons. If these genes are not expressed properly, then our brains cannot function normally. Also, these chemicals caused an elevated expression of genes associated with inflammation in the nervous system. This so-called neuroinflammation is commonly seen in autism and neurodegenerative conditions.

The researchers also found that these chemicals stimulated the production of free radicals – particles that can damage the basic building blocks of cells and that have been implicated in a number of brain diseases. The chemicals also disrupted neuron microtubules.

“Disrupting microtubules affects the function of synapses in mature neurons and can impair the movement of cells as the brain develops,” Zylka said. “We know that deficits in neuron migration can lead to neurodevelopmental abnormalities. We have not yet evaluated whether these chemicals impair brain development in animal models or people.”

Jeannie T. Lee, MD, PhD, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, who was not involved in this research, said, “This is a very important study that should serve as a wake-up call to regulatory agencies and the general medical community. The work is timely and has wide-ranging implications not only for diseases like autism, Parkinson’s, and cancer, but also for the health of future generations. I suspect that a number of these chemicals will turn out to have effects on transgenerational inheritance.”

Zylka’s group also analyzed information from the U.S. Geological Survey, which monitors countywide pesticide usage, as well as the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which test foodstuffs yearly for pesticide residues.

Of the chemicals Zylka’s team studied, only the usage of pyridaben has decreased since 2000. Rotenone use has remained the same since 2000. However, the use of all the fungicides in this group has increased dramatically over the past decade.

Indeed, a study from the Environmental Protection Agency found that pyraclostrobin is found on foods at levels that could potentially affect human biology, and another study linked pyraclostrobin usage to honeybee colony collapse disorder.

The pesticide rotenone was previously implicated in Parkinson’s disease through replicated animal experiments and through human epidemiological studies. A separate 2015 UNC study found that Parkinson’s disease is much more common in older adults with autism than in older adults without autism.

Previous work has also shown that a single dose of the fungicide trifloxystrobin reduced motor activity for several hours in female rats and for days in male rats. Disrupted motor function is a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease and other neurological disorders. The related fungicide picoxystrobin impaired motor activity in rats at the lowest dose tested.

Zylka added, “The real tough question is: if you eat fruits, vegetables or cereals that contain these chemicals, do they get into your blood stream and at what concentration? That information doesn’t exist.” Also, given their presence on a variety of foodstuffs, might long term exposure to these chemicals – even at low doses – have a cumulative effect on the brain?

Zylka noted that conventionally grown leafy green vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, and kale have the highest levels of these fungicides. But due to each chemical’s effectiveness at reducing fungal blights and rust, crop yields have increased and farmers are expanding their use of these chemicals to include many additional types of food crops.

Zylka’s team hopes their research will encourage other scientists and regulatory agencies to take a closer look at these fungicides and follow up with epidemiological studies.

“Virtually nothing is known about how these chemicals impact the developing or adult brain,” Zylka said. “Yet these chemicals are being used at increasing levels on many of the foods we eat.”

This research was funded by three of the National Institutes of Health: the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institute on Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Mark Zylka, PhD, is a member of the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. He was named director of the UNC Neuroscience Center in January and will take over for current director William Snider, MD, in July. Brandon Pearson, PhD, and Jeremy Simon, PhD, were co-first authors on the study. Additional authors from UNC include Eric McCoy, PhD, Giulia Fragola, PhD, and Gabriela Salazar.

A Generation in Jeopardy: How Pesticides Are Undermining Our Children’s Health and Intelligence—came out in 2012 and will get republished this spring with added information. Not only will the 2016 version have updated data, incorporating newer scientific studies, it will also examine environmental effects from agricultural chemicals in rural areas.
Practice the Precautionary Principle before using any pesticide or chemical when children may be exposed.

The latter report—A Generation in Jeopardy: How Pesticides Are Undermining Our Children’s Health and Intelligence—came out in 2012 and will get republished this spring with added information. Not only will the 2016 version have updated data, incorporating newer scientific studies, it will also examine environmental effects from agricultural chemicals in rural areas.

Practice the precautionary principle when using chemical pesticides when children may be exposed. Read the SDS Safety Data sheet to determine if the chemical is safe nit “relatively safe” by completely safe if children are in the area and may be exposed .

Developing and vulnerable Children most susceptible agricultural pesticides, residue on produce By Evan Tuchinsky. The Pesticide Action Network seeks to spread awareness of the environmental health risks of agricultural pesticides.

https://www.newsreview.com/chico/developing-vulnerable/content?oid=20422812 Continue Reading »

The lead crisis in Flint, Mich. has drawn national attention to deadly and often underreported risks in the public water supply. Thanks to the chemical, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries, and antiquated water systems, Americans are imbibing a witch’s brew of drugs and chemicals often without realizing it. https://www.organicconsumers.org/essays/drugs-drinking-water-dont-ask-and-officials-wont-tell by Martha Rosenberg  contributing writer to the Organic Consumers Association

These contaminants get into the water through human drug waste in sewage, medicines flushed down toilets, agricultural runoff and the wide use of endocrine disruptors like pesticides, flame retardants and plastic-related compounds like phthalates and BPA. (BPA has ironically been used in bottled water that people drink to avoid tap water risks!)

When it comes to pharmaceuticals in the water supply, both drug industry and water treatment professionals say traces are so small they probably pose no public health risk. Yet they also admit that testing has begun so recently that no one really knows the long-term effects.

“There’s no doubt about it, pharmaceuticals are being detected in the environment and there is genuine concern that these compounds, in the small concentrations that they’re at, could be causing impacts to human health or to aquatic organisms,” noted Mary Buzby, director of environmental technology for Merck. Free–and unwanted–drugs in the drinking water

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The Myths of Safe Pesticides by André Leu.  Andre Leu challenges conventional farming methods by refuting the myths that surround the use and understanding of pesticides.

In his new book The Myths of Safe Pesticides, Andre Leu  exposes the dangers of these chemicals. The chemical-based conventional agriculture industry claims that the synthesized concoctions they sell as pesticides, herbicides, and insecticides are safe when used as directed, but does the scientific evidence truly support their assertions?

Lecturer André Leu delves into a wealth of respected scientific journals to present the peer-reviewed evidence that proves the claims of chemical companies and pesticide regulators are not all they seem.
André Leu challenges conventional farming methods by refuting the myths that surround the use and understanding of pesticides. He exposes the dangers of these chemicals. http://www.acresusa.com/the-myths-of-safe-pesticides

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