Feeds:
Posts
Comments

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function
Of the mice that received the treatment, 75 percent got their memory functions back.
Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques – structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

http://www.sciencealert.com/new-alzheimer-s-treatment-fully-restores-memory-function Continue Reading »

Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy. Sasaki Y1, Araki T, Milbrandt J.

Abstract- Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. Continue Reading »

Brain CT signs and the effect of alteplase after stroke 

The third International Stroke Trial (IST-3) is the largest (n=3035) randomised controlled trial of intravenous alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke to date. A meta-analysis of individual patient data from nine randomised trials (including IST-3) showed that intravenous alteplase improved outcome when administered up to 4·5 h after stroke onset.  The proportional benefit from alteplase increased with earlier treatment but was not modified by age.  IST-3 is a landmark study because the effects of alteplase could be assessed reliably in older patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

Continue Reading »

Researchers warn that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene may disrupt people’s hormone systems at levels deemed “safe” by feds  Published April 15, 2015 By Brian Bienkowski Environmental Health News ( see link below to complete article) http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2015/apr/endocrine-disruption-hormones-benzene-solvents

Four chemicals present both inside and outside homes might disrupt our endocrine systems at levels considered safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to an analysis released today.

The chemicals – benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene – are ubiquitous: in the air outside and in many products inside homes and businesses. They have been linked to reproductive, respiratory and heart problems, as well as smaller babies. Now researchers from The Endocrine Disruption Exchange (TEDX) and the University of Colorado, Boulder, say that such health impacts may be due to the chemicals’ ability to interfere with people’s hormones at low exposure levels. Continue Reading »

Why the Precautionary Principle is so important to the health of our families- especially our children and grandchildren
If you opted to NOT spray  PESTICIDES at your home or school you made the wise decision  
This wise decision is the Precautionary Principle. 
And It is such a very fortunate decision because on the 20th of March 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, assessed the carcinogenicity of pesticides, and classified the herbicide Glyphosate and the insecticides Malathion and Diazinon as probable carcinogenic to humans. 

Continue Reading »

Harmful effects of molds. The type and severity of health effects that result from molds exposure is widely variable among different locations, from person to person and over time In any case, molds growth in the indoor environment should be considered unacceptable from the perspectives of potential adverse health effects and building performance. http://enhs.umn.edu/current/5103/molds/harmful.html

Although difficult to predict, exposure to molds growing indoors is most often associated with the following allergy symptoms:
Nasal and sinus congestion
Cough/sore throat
Chest tightness
Dyspnea (breathing difficulty)
Asthma (or exacerbation of it)
Epistaxis (nosebleed)
Upper respiratory tract infections
Headache
Skin and eye irritation

Indoor molds exposure leads mostly to upper respiratory tract symptoms
Long-term exposure to indoor molds is certainly unhealthy to anyone, but some groups will develop more severe symptoms sooner than others, including:
Infants and children
Elderly people
Individuals with respiratory conditions, allergies and/or asthma
Immunocompromised patients
Some indoor molds are capable of producing extremely potent toxins (mycotoxins) that are lipid-soluble and readily absorbed by the intestinal lining, airways, and skin. These agents, usually contained in the fungal spores, have toxic effects ranging from short-term irritation to immunosuppression and cancer. 

More severe symptoms that could result from continuous human exposure to indoor mycotoxigenic molds include:
Cancer (aflatoxin best characterized as potential human carcinogen)
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis/pulmonary fibrosis
Pulmonary injury/hemosiderosis (bleeding)
Neurotoxicity
Hematologic and immunologic disorders
Hepatic, endocrine and/or renal toxicities
Pregnancy, gastrointestinal and/or cardiac conditions
It is important to notice that the clinical relevance of mycotoxins under realistic airborne exposure levels is not fully established. Further, some or much of the supporting evidence for these other health effects is based on case studies rather than controlled studies, studies that have not yet been reproduced or involve symptoms that are subjective.

Among the indoor mycotoxin-producing species of molds are Fusarium, Trichoderma, and one that, although less commonly isolated, became notorious during the past decade, Stachybotrys atra (aka S. chartarum, black mold). Between 1993 and 1994, there was an unusual outbreak of pulmonary hemorrhage in infants in Cleveland, Ohio, where one kid died. Researchers found that the kids’ homes had previously sustained water damage that resulted in molds contamination, and the quantity of molds, including S. chartarum, was higher in the homes of infants with pulmonary hemorrhage than in those of controls.

The American Academy of Pediatrics produced guidelines in the wake of the outbreak. Other incidents involving kids in Stachybotrys-contaminated water-damaged school buildings have captured headlines as well, with children becoming symptom-free after being removed from those environments.

The role of S. chartarum in pulmonary hemorrhage in the Cleveland incident and in human health in the indoor environment is not clear though. There is not enough evidence to prove a solid causal relationship between S. chartarum and these health problems. Actually, in 2000 the CDC released two reports critical of the study conducted in Cleveland and concluded that the association between S. chartarum and acute pulmonary hemorrhage was not proven.

While case studies certainly indicate the possibility or even the plausibility of an effect from molds exposure, such studies by their nature cannot address whether the effect is common or widespread among building occupants. Results from studies that have not been reproduced may be spurious or have yet to be confirmed by well-designed follow up studies. (Photo: Moldy humid walls in a closet space)

In large epidemiologic studies, general symptoms have been associated with moisture damaged and presumably moldy buildings. Many of the reported symptoms are subjective and difficult to quantify. Results are confounded by the fact that the association is general, and mold is not the only possible cause of the symptoms. Neither condition proves that mold is NOT a cause.

In any case, molds growth in the indoor environment should be considered unacceptable from the perspectives of potential adverse health effects and building performance.

Dose-response. There is almost a complete lack of information on specific human responses to well-defined exposures to molds contaminants. There is currently no proven method to measure the type or amount of mold that a person is exposed to, and common symptoms associated with molds exposure are non-specific, aggravated by the facts that molds are present everywhere in the environment and that responses to exposure vary greatly among individuals. (Photo: Heavy mold growth on the underside of spruce floorboards)

There are no accepted standards for molds sampling in indoor environments or for analyzing and interpreting the data in terms of human health. Most studies are then based primarily on baseline environmental data rather than on human dose-response data. Neither OSHA or NIOSH, nor the EPA has set a standard or PEL for molds exposure.

Mold growth on air diffuser in ceiling
Miller et al. (1988) stated that it is reasonable to assume there is a problem if a single species predominates with >50 CFU/m3, that <150 CFU/m3 is acceptable if there is a mix of benign species, and that there is no problem when up to 300 CFU/m3 of Cladosporium or other common fungi is isolated. There is no source material to support these assertions, as few inhalation studies have been conducted.

References

American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Environmental Health. 1998. Toxic effects of indoor molds. Pediatrics. 101:712-714. 11/23/03

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. State of the Science on Molds and Human Health. 11/15/03

US Environmental Protection Agency – Indoor Air Quality – Molds. 11/15/03

Kuhn, D. M., and M. A. Ghannoum. 2003. Indoor mold, toxigenic fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: infectious disease perspective. Clin Microbiol Rev. 16(1):144-172. 11/15/03

Miller, J. D., A. M. Laflamme, Y. Sobol, P. Lafontaine and R. Greenhalgh. 1988. Fungi and fungal products in some Canadian houses. Int. Biodeterior. 24:103-120.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. Update: Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Hemosiderosis Among Infants — Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. 49(9):180-184. 11/17/03

Nelson, B. D. 2001. Stachybotrys chartarum: The Toxic Indoor Mold – APSnet. 11/23/03

The herbicide glyphosate and the insecticides malathion and diazinon were classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. .The insecticides tetrachlorvinphos and parathion were classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans(Group 2B)IARC Monographs Volume 112: evaluation of five organophosphate insecticides and herbicidesLyon, France, 20 March 2015 – The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, has assessed the carcinogenicity of five organophosphate pesticides.

A summary of the final evaluations together with a short rationale have now been published online in The Lancet Oncology, and the detailed assessments will be published as Volume 112 of the IARC Monographs.What were the results of the IARC evaluations Continue Reading »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,562 other followers