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Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption — that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution’s objectives or integrity.

In this symposium of The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 16 authors investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs and what is corrupted.

This introductory essay summarizes each article, discusses the key theme that run through the articles, and provides SSRN web links to access each of the 16 articles.

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2298140## Continue Reading »

Institutional Corruption and the Pharmaceutical Policy, Marc A. Rodwin Suffolk University Law School; Harvard University – Edmond J. Safra Center for EthicsJournal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 41, p, 544, 2013 Suffolk University Law School Research Paper No. 13-25

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2298140

Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption – that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution’s objectives or integrity. In this symposium, 16 articles investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs, and what is corrupted. We will see that the pharmaceutical industry’s own purposes are often undermined. Furthermore, pharmaceutical industry funding of election campaigns and lobbying skews the legislative process that sets pharmaceutical policy. Moreover, certain practices have corrupted medical research, the production of medical knowledge, the practice of medicine, drug safety, the Food and Drug Administration’s oversight of the pharmaceutical market, and the trustworthiness of patient advocacy organizations. In this symposium of The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 16 authors investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs and what is corrupted. This introductory essay summarizes each article, discusses the key theme that run through the articles, and provides SSRN web links to access each of the 16 articles. The articles are organized into five topics: (1) systemic problems, (2) medical research, (3) medical knowledge and practice, (4) marketing, and (5) patient advocacy organizations. Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption — that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution’s objectives or integrity. We will see that the pharmaceutical industry’s own purposes are often undermined. In addition, pharmaceutical industry funding of election campaigns and lobbying skews the legislative process that sets pharmaceutical policy. Moreover, certain practices have corrupted medical research, the production of medical knowledge, the practice of medicine, drug safety, and the Food and Drug Administration’s oversight of pharmaceutical marketing. As a result, practitioners may think they are using reliable information to engage in sound medical practice while actually relying on misleading information and therefore prescribe drugs that are unnecessary or harmful to patients, or more costly than equivalent medications. At the same time, patients and the public may believe that patient advocacy organizations effectively represent their interests while these organizations actually neglect their interests. Continue Reading »

A two-phase study evaluating the relationship between Thimerosal-containing vaccine administration and the risk for an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis in the United States. Geier DA, Hooker BS, Kern JK, King PG, Sykes LK, Geier MR

Routine childhood vaccination is an important public health tool to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases, but the present study provides new epidemiological evidence supporting an association between increasing organic-Hg exposure from Thimerosal-containing childhood vaccines and the subsequent risk of an ASD diagnosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24354891 Continue Reading »

Thimerosal Exposure and the Role of Sulfation Chemistry and Thiol Availability in Autism

http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/10/8/3771

Janet K. Kern , Boyd E. Haley David A. Geier  Lisa K. Sykes, Paul G. King  Mark R. Geier

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological disorder in which a significant number of the children experience a developmental regression characterized by a loss of previously acquired skills and abilities.

Typically reported are losses of verbal, nonverbal, and social abilities. Several recent studies suggest that children diagnosed with an ASD have abnormal sulfation chemistry, limited thiol availability, and decreased glutathione (GSH) reserve capacity, resulting in a compromised oxidation/reduction (redox) and detoxification capacity.

Research indicates that the availability of thiols, particularly GSH, can influence the effects of thimerosal (TM) and other mercury (Hg) compounds. Continue Reading »

The Precautionary Principle should be the rule when it comes to pesticides

In March 2015 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, assessed the carcinogenicity of pesticides, and has classified the herbicide Glyphosate and the insecticides Malathion and Diazinon as probable carcinogenic to humans.

http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/iarcnews/pdf/MonographVolume112.pdf

That is one huge reason the The Precautionary Principle should be the rule when it comes to pesticides which is what should be practiced at all schools parks and homes – anywhere where children congregate Continue Reading »

EPA released three final risk assessments for specific uses of three chemicals found in common household products. The risk assessment for Dichloromethane (DCM), which is widely used in paint stripping products, indicates health risks to both workers and consumers who use these products, and to bystanders in workplaces and residences where DCM is used. EPA estimates that more than 230,000 workers nationwide are directly exposed to DCM from DCM-containing paint strippers.

http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/0/9b8c8609521a27bc85257d420059da44?OpenDocument

http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/riskassess.html

Continue Reading »

Treat the Earth well. 

It was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children.

We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.

-Ancient Indian Proverb

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